Texas’s Renewable Natural Gas Boom

What is Renewable Natural Gas?

Renewable Natural Gas is pipeline quality or transportation fuel quality biogas. RNG is primarily methane captured off landfills, farm digesters, and wastewater treatment plants. RNG is produced from non-fossil, organic waste sources and is 100% compatible with geologic natural gas – as a drop in blend or complete substitute. On a lifecycle basis, RNG yields a 70-130% emission reduction as compared to diesel.

Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program

The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) requires transportation fuel sold in the United States to contain a minimum volume of renewable fuels to replace or reduce the quantity of petroleum-based transportation fuel, heating oil or jet fuel each year. It was part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), and is regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The four renewable fuel categories under the RFS are:

  • Biomass-based diesel
  • Cellulosic biofuel
  • Advanced biofuel
  • Total renewable fuel

For a fuel to qualify as a renewable fuel under the RFS program:

  • Fuels must achieve a reduction in EPA designated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as compared to a 2005 petroleum baseline.
  • Companies need to petition for new fuel pathway. A fuel pathway is a specific combination of three components: (1) feedstock, (2) production process and (3) fuel type.
  • RINs (Renewable Identification Numbers) are used for bookkeeping & meeting RFS targets

Most biomethane qualifies as Cellulosic Biofuel under the RFS and generates a D3 RIN. In some cases, biomethane qualifies as an Advanced Biofuel and generates a D5 RIN.

Who Is using RNG vehicle fuel?

RNG is produced for vehicle fuel at 37 sites across the U.S. In 2016, 230 Million gallons of RNG will fuel mostly medium and heavy duty vehicles at public, private and municipal stations.  

UPS

  • Agreement with Clean Energy Fuels Corp. to use up to 500,000 gallon equivalents of RNG annually in Texas.
  • UPS stations in Houston & Mesquite will dispense the RLNG to a fleet of about 140 UPS tractors.
  • UPS California current agreement w/ Clean Energy, is using 1.5 M gallon equivalents of RCNG, UPS operates nearly 400 CNG vehicles.

Fair Oaks Farm, one of the largest dairy farms nationwide, has partnered with ampCNG to transform manure from 15,000 cows into 1.5 million DGEs of bio-CNG per year. ampCNG operates 19 public CNG stations and provides fuel for dairy haulers and other national fleets. It currently produces  approximately two million DGEs of RNG per year, with plans to dispense 100% RCNG in 2017.

How much is a RIN worth?

RINS are based on an ethanol gallon. Converted into renewable CNG measurements, a gasoline gallon equivalent of CNG has 1.5 RIN and is worth about $3 in 2016. According to Luke Morrow, Morrow Renewables, typically 70-80 percent of the $3 value goes to the producer, 10-20 percent to the pipeline distribution company and 2.5-10 percent to the refueling station owner.

Parties can either use actual “wet” gallons, trade through brokers, or purchase credits from other obligated parties. These credits are identified and tracked through a Renewable Identification Number and are known as RINs. See RIN Fact Sheet.

RNG used in vehicles generates higher value than that used in power generation, because there are no RINs available for power generation. Air LiquideAir LiquideCan I create long-term contracts with a refiner or other obligated party to buy my RINs?

Renewable fuel producers such as landfill operators, dairy farms or other organic waste producers generate RINs when a producer makes a gallon of renewable fuel. They can be traded, carried over to the following year and used by “obligated parties” to show compliance with their volume obligations. RINs have a vintage year corresponding to the year they are produced and typically have a maximum life span of 18 months.

Are there sources of RNG in Texas?

  • Cambrian Energy owns and operates a biomethane production facility at: McCommas Bluff landfill in Dallas. (15 million cubic feet per day, 2014.)
  • Morrow Renewables owns and operates six landfill sites in south Texas to produce RNG for vehicle use.
  • Toro Energy owns and operates two landfill sites in Texas.
  • Montauk Energy owns and operates two landfill sites in Texas.
  • Ameresco developed and operates the San Antonio Wastewater Treatment Plant RNG project.

RNG Trucking Solutions

NGV Global Group Has expanded their operations facility in Dallas Tx recently as demand continues to rise. NGV Global Retrofits and remanufactures all truck classes to be RNG ready. From Class-6 local delivery trucks to semi trailers NGV Global Group’s expert experience has been helping fleets nationally fulfill their CNG/RNG Trucking Needs for years. NGV Global Group’s unique style involves building a custom solution and guiding the customer from start to finish.

GET MORE INFO on CNG vehicle acquisition for your business

NGV Global Group Inc.

10733 Spangler Rd,

Dallas, TX 75220 USA

Phone: +1 (214) 630-1000

Mail: info@ngvglobalgroup.com

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New Natural Gas Buses are Zero Emissions Equivalent and More Reliable then Electric Buses

New Natural Gas Buses are Zero Emissions Equivalent
Natural gas buses today reduce harmful emissions of
nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) by more
than 95 percent compared to transit buses built prior to 2010,
thus the emission difference between new natural gas buses
and electric buses, which have no tailpipe emissions but do
have particulate matter emissions associated with tire wear
and braking, are miniscule. Importantly, natural gas buses
produce these emission reductions without relying upon
costly and cumbersome emission control equipment.
Fueling transit buses with conventional (geologic) natural gas
reduces greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by about 12
percent compared to diesel. But according to the California
Air Resources Board, fueling buses with renewable natural
gas (biomethane) collected at local landfills, wastewater
treatment plants, commercial food waste facilities, and
agricultural digesters can yield a carbon-negative lifecycle
emissions result. According to CARB data, renewable natural
gas (RNG) holds the lowest carbon intensity of any on-road
vehicle fuel, including fully renewable electric. On-road
natural gas fueling trends show increasing adoption of RNG.
According to data from the U.S. Energy Information
Administration (EIA) and U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) Renewable Fuel Standard reporting, 39
percent of all on-road natural gas fuel in 2019 was RNG. In
California, 77 percent of all on-road natural gas fuel in 2019
was RNG.

When you add it all up, natural gas provides a winning
solution for transit agencies looking to lower costs and
reduce emissions. As estimated in this report, it could cost
billions – as much as $24 billion more – to switch the majority
of the U.S. larger bus fleets to an all-electric fleet. Switching
the majority of the U.S. bus fleet to an all-CNG fleet powered
by RNG would not only save significant capital and operating
amounts of money but also would generate much greater
annual emission reductions: 10,000 tons of GHG, 25 tons of
NOx, and 6.26 tons of PM2.5

Grid Upgrades
Electric bus advocates fail to evaluate the cost and extent of
major utility upgrades needed to accommodate an
expected surge in electricity transmission and demand for
electric buses, upgrades not needed to fuel natural gas
buses. These factors are easily overlooked in the case of
demonstration projects involving only a limited number of
buses but can quickly become overwhelming when
converting an entire fleet to electricity. This is not an issue for
natural gas as many bus facilities around the country have
been converted entirely or almost entirely to natural gas with
hundreds of buses fueling at a single depot. Nearly 100
transit agencies currently operate more than 10,000 natural
gas buses with additional natural gas buses successfully in
service at many other facilities such as airports and colleges
across the United States.
Reliability
In the reports evaluated by NGVAmerica, natural gas buses
have demonstrated that they are more reliable than electric
buses, accumulating far more service miles, spending fewer
days out of service and under-repair than electric buses. A
key factor of reliability is availability for pull out. In the studies
prepared by NREL evaluating real-world bus fleets, natural
gas buses morethan exceed the expected rate of 85 percent
availability while electric buses struggle to meet the
requirement. In the Foothill fleet, during the most recent
evaluation period the twelve 35-foot electric buses had an
average availability rate of 63 percent.

The availability for electric buses was as low as 46 percent during
the first half of 2019. In contrast, CNG buses had an
availability rate of 93 percent for the same period and an
overall availability rate of 96 percent.4
Once out on route, CNG buses had far fewer road calls, or
revenue vehicle system failures, than their electric
counterparts in the Foothill study. Such incidents require a
bus to be replaced on route and/or cause a significant
schedule delay affecting system operations. Such reliability
in the transit industry is measured in mean distance (miles)
between failures (road calls), or MBRC. At Foothill, the
average miles between road calls for natural gas buses
exceeds that of the BEBs by between 18,000 to almost
20,000 miles.5
Fuel Efficiency
Much attention is given to the efficiency of electric buses but
very few studies or reports acknowledge efficiency losses
associated with charging infrastructure which can increase
energy consumption by 10 – 15 percent. And when
determining the overall energy efficiency of electric bus
transit operations, it is important to consider that more than
60 percent of energy used to generate electricity is lost in
conversion. According to the U.S. Department of Energy,
U.S. utility-scale generation facilities consumed 38 quadrillion
British thermal units (quads) of energy to produce only 14
quads of electricity last year.6
Efficiency claims also almost never acknowledge the tradeoffs associated with heating and cooling of buses, which is
not accounted for in the test cycles used to determine
efficiency ratings of transit buses. Another fact that is often
omitted is the large percentage of electric buses that are
equipped with fossil fueled heaters to reduce the need to
draw on electricity to provide heat. Such heaters can be a
significant emission source that are not at all considered.

If you would like a no cost obligation in regard to Bus Fleet Options. Please contact us for a consultation.

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NGV Global Group Inc.

10733 Spangler Rd,

Dallas, TX 75220 USA

Phone: +1 (214) 630-1000

Mail: info@ngvglobalgroup.com

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SoCalGas Utility now adding RNG produced in state to the 100% renewable fuel used at its fueling stations

LOS ANGELES, Oct. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Southern California Gas Co. (SoCalGas) today announced it is for the first time dispensing California-produced renewable natural gas (RNG) at many of the natural gas fueling stations it operates across the state. The utility recently began purchasing RNG from Pixley-based Calgren Dairy Fuels (Calgren), which captures the greenhouse gas-producing manure from dairy farms and turns it into RNG, a renewable fuel. SoCalGas has dispensed 100% RNG from out-of-state sources at its fueling stations for a year. Calgren’s facility is part of a rapidly growing biomethane industry in California and is currently the largest dairy biogas operation in the U.S.

Photos of the fueling stations and Calgren’s dairy digester facility are available here. A video demonstrating RNG’s ability to reduce California’s transportation emissions is available here.

“RNG is an important tool in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, which cause climate change, and we’re looking forward to major growth in production of this renewable fuel in California,” said Jawaad Malik, SoCalGas vice president of gas acquisition.  “With the right incentives in place, RNG has significant opportunity to help the state move toward carbon-neutrality in not only the transportation sector but in many areas where traditional natural gas is now used.”

“Calgren is excited to be one of the leading production facilities in the U.S., which will eventually capture the waste of more than 132,000 cows from at least 18 dairies,” said Lyle Schlyer, president of Calgren.  “Using the methane captured from dairy waste for transportation fuel is good for the environment because it not only keeps methane from escaping to the air, it allows us to replace traditional natural gas with a renewable version, and it reduces pollution from diesel truck engines.”

RNG is produced when methane, a greenhouse gas that occurs naturally when organic waste breaks down, is captured and upgraded to pipeline standards rather than being released into the air. Organic waste sources such as dairy farms, landfills, sewage, food waste, and dead forest trees create about 80% of all methane emissions in California. Capturing this methane and converting it to RNG rapidly reduces greenhouse gas emissions. In California, a 2016 law requires a 40% reduction of methane emissions from waste sources, with provisions to deliver that energy to customers.

Production of the fuel has accelerated quickly in California, supported by state incentive programs seeking to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from trucking and dairy farms.  In just the next three and a half years, at least 160 RNG production facilities will be online in California to serve the transportation fuel sector, producing more than 15.8 million therms of carbon-negative RNG every year and replacing about 119 million gallons of diesel fuel.  That’s enough to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by over 3.4 million tons every year, the equivalent of taking more than 730,000 cars off the road.

Renewable natural gas trucks currently displace about 150 million gallons of diesel fuel in California. By increasing RNG trucks by ten times and decreasing diesel trucks by half, California could cut NOx emissions by 200 tons and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 10 million tons.

In addition, California recently enacted legislation that expands the definition of renewable natural gas to include organic waste such as dead trees, agricultural waste and vegetation removed for wildfire mitigation which is typically converted to RNG by non-combustion thermal conversion.  The new legislation has a twin benefit of helping to manage wildfires with reduced debris and also lowering greenhouse gas emissions.

To help expand the growth and use of RNG, SoCalGas has proposed a service that would give its customers the option to purchase a portion of their natural gas from renewable sources, just as millions of people can opt to purchase renewable electricity today.  The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) has issued a draft ruling authorizing such a service, which is expected to be voted on by the end of the year.

Investment in RNG is also growing beyond California.  Oregon recently enacted legislation allowing its natural gas utilities to purchase RNG on behalf of its customers, with the goal of replacing 15% of traditional natural gas with RNG by 2030.  Virginia-based Dominion Energy has committed to investing in enough RNG projects to make its gas infrastructure net-zero carbon by 2040.  In 20 years, enough RNG could be available in the U.S. to replace about 90% of the nation’s current residential natural gas consumption, according to a recent study by ICF.

About SoCalGas
Headquartered in Los Angeles, SoCalGas® is the largest gas distribution utility in the United States. SoCalGas delivers affordable, reliable, clean and increasingly renewable gas service to 21.8 million customers across 24,000 square miles of Central and Southern California, where more than 90 percent of residents use natural gas for heating, hot water, cooking, drying clothes or other uses. Gas delivered through the company’s pipelines also plays a key role in providing electricity to Californians— about 45 percent of electric power generated in the state comes from gas-fired power plants.

SoCalGas’ vision is to be the cleanest gas utility in North America, delivering affordable and increasingly renewable energy to its customers. In support of that vision, SoCalGas is committed to replacing 20 percent of its traditional natural gas supply with renewable gas by 2030. Renewable natural gas is made from waste created by dairy farms, landfills and wastewater treatment plants. SoCalGas is also committed to investing in its gas delivery infrastructure while keeping bills affordable for our customers. From 2014 through 2018, the company invested nearly $6.5 billion to upgrade and modernize its pipeline system to enhance safety and reliability. SoCalGas is a subsidiary of Sempra Energy (NYSE: SRE), an energy services holding company based in San Diego. For more information visit socalgas.com/newsroom or connect with SoCalGas on Twitter (@SoCalGas), Instagram (@SoCalGas) and Facebook. 

For more information on how to acquire your CNG/RNG Box Trucks, Busses and Semi Trucks please give us a call. We can walk you through the steps and help you weigh your options regardless of your company size.  

GET MORE INFO

NGV Global Group Inc.

10733 Spangler Rd,

Dallas, TX 75220 USA

Phone: +1 (214) 630-1000

Mail: info@ngvglobalgroup.com

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Study Shows Comprehensive Alternative Fuels Approach Achieves Greater Emissions Reductions Than Single Technology Focus

Erick Sanchez• October 27, 2020

Analysis of Texas and California Transportation Subsidy Programs Reveals Electric-Only Focus Fails

Washington, DC – At its NGV20 Annual Industry Summit last week, NGVAmerica released the results of a multi-month study of public transportation subsidy programs in the States of Texas and California, and the results are quite striking.

Over a fifteen-year time period from 2005 to 2019, the State of Texas spent $561 million in public resources to assist in the transition to cleaner vehicle technologies.  During the same time period, the State of California spent $816 million, or 46 percent more.  However, in terms of reducing harmful criteria pollutants to improve air quality, California achieved only a 35,229-ton reduction in NOx emissions despite its increased investment while Texas tallied reductions of 61,610 tons of NOx.  Effectively, California regulators spent 46 percent more public money while accomplishing 43 percent less than Texas.

“This analysis presents a stark reality for state and federal policymakers to consider,” said NGVAmerica President Dan Gage.  “Compared to California’s ZEV-only focus, the Texas approach results in less money spent, deploys more clean heavy-duty trucks and buses on the road, and achieves greater emissions reductions.  The public is best served if state and federal regulators concentrate less on imposing single technology purchases and more on establishing realistic emissions reduction goals while allowing fleets the flexibility to choose the powertrain technology that best meets their needs.”

In completing its analysis, NGVAmerica collected data from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TXCEQ) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and California Energy Commission (CEC).  California focused its funding on medium- and heavy-duty battery electric vehicle test projects.  In contrast, Texas focused on replacing older, dirtier medium- and heavy-duty diesel trucks with newer, cleaner, CNG, LNG, LPG diesel, and diesel hybrid alternatives.  Overall, Texas spent 31 percent less money on more heavy-duty vehicles and reduced 75 percent more harmful NOx emissions than California.

Since 2000, Texas has reduced its NOx emissions by 69 percent while its total population has increased by 35 percent.  Meanwhile, from 2006 to 2013, California reported annual NOx emissions of 160,000 tons per year.  Since that time – and despite its increased Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV)-focused investment – California’s annual emissions have increased to about 175,000 tons per year.

Texas continues its clean air achievement by supporting vehicle choice and an “all of the above” approach to alternative fuel vehicle technologies.  As Texas begins to add renewable natural gas (RNG) to its natural gas vehicle investments, Texas is creating actual carbon-free fleet solutions today.

While supportive of increased RNG production capacity, California is moving to limit the best use of this captured biomethane – as a transportation fuel – by supporting only ZEV purchases that require massive amounts of public funding to subsidize.

NGVs fueled with RNG are the most immediate and cost-effective carbon-free transportation solution available now.  According to CARB’s own data, RNG holds the lowest carbon intensity of any on-road vehicle fuel, including fully renewable electric.

“Now more than ever, communities need affordable, available, and easily scalable clean transportation solutions that address pollution while ensuring that public funding is put to its best use,” added Gage.  “Natural gas vehicles fueled by RNG is the best carbon-free, zero now solution.”

For more information on how to acquire your CNG/RNG Box Trucks, Busses and Semi Trucks please give us a call. We can walk you through the steps and help you weigh your options regardless of your company size.  

GET MORE INFO

NGV Global Group Inc.

10733 Spangler Rd,

Dallas, TX 75220 USA

Phone: +1 (214) 630-1000

Mail: info@ngvglobalgroup.com

Full access to the study document is available in NGVAmerica’s online Resource Center at: https://www.ngvamerica.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/NGVAmerica-Which-Road-TX-vs-CA-Investments.pdf

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Request For Information from MEC Programs For Alternative Fuel Vehicle Procurement

Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), have issued a request for information (RFI) for alternative fuel vehicle procurement and supporting fueling equipment.

Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC) manages several federal projects that offer incentives or reimbursements to sub-awardees and occasionally must re-allocate funds under our projects. The purpose of this Request for Information (RFI) is to solicit feedback from government agencies, commercial fleets and other alternative fuel stakeholders on issues related to procurement of alternative fuel vehicles and supporting fueling equipment and installation. This information will help us design requests for proposals that better meet our stakeholders’ needs. Read on after the questions for planned upcoming funding opportunities. 

Alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and other advanced vehicles offer a number of important benefits, such as fuel diversification for energy security, environmental benefits, and potential cost savings over the life of the vehicle. However, AFVs often have higher initial costs compared to conventional vehicles. Higher AFV and advanced technology vehicle prices can be attributed not only to manufacturers spreading costs over fewer vehicles, but also to the complexities of marketing and supplying vehicles to meet diverse local requirements and fleet needs. This is the deployment barrier our projects seek to minimize. 

This is solely a Request for Information, limited to respondents whose deployments will be located in Missouri, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska, and not a funding opportunity or request for proposals. MEC is not currently accepting applications. This questionnaire should take less than 10 minutes. Submissions are requested by September 30, 2020. 

MEC would like your input on how we can help you with your goals regarding alternative fuel vehicles and fueling infrastructure. 

For more information on how to acquire your CNG/RNG Box Trucks, Busses and Semi Trucks please give us a call. We can walk you through the steps and help you weigh your options regardless of your company size.  

GET MORE INFO

NGV Global Group Inc.

10733 Spangler Rd,

Dallas, TX 75220 USA

Phone: +1 (214) 630-1000

Mail: info@ngvglobalgroup.com

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California’s New Low-NOx Rules Concern Truck, Engine Makers

The California Air Resources Board approved sweeping new emissions regulations affecting heavy-duty trucks sold in the state. An organization representing truck and engine makers decried the new rule.

The Omnibus Low-NOX Rule, approved by CARB on Aug. 28 will require engine NOx emissions to be cut to approximately 75% below current standards beginning in 2024, and 90% below current standards in 2027.

The rule also places nine additional regulatory requirements on new heavy-duty truck and engines. Those additional requirements include a 50% reduction in particulate matter emissions, stringent new low-load and idle standards, a new in-use testing protocol, extended deterioration requirements, a new California-only credit program, and extended mandatory warranty requirements.

“CARB’s far-reaching Omnibus Low-NOX Rule is not technologically feasible or cost-effective,” said Jed Mandel, president of the Truck and Engine Manufacturers Association. “In addition, the requirements starting in 2024 fail to provide the statutorily required minimum lead time for manufacturers to develop the technologies.”

The regulatory requirements in the Omnibus Low-NOX Rule will first become effective in 2024, at the same time as the Advanced Clean Trucks regulations that CARB approved on June 25 that mandates manufacturers convert increasing percentages of their heavy-duty trucks sold in California to zero-emission vehicles.

CARB says oxides of nitrogen, or NOx, is a precursor to smog, which can cause or exacerbate numerous respiratory and other health ailments and is associated with premature death.
 - Graph: CARB
CARB says oxides of nitrogen, or NOx, is a precursor to smog, which can cause or exacerbate numerous respiratory and other health ailments and is associated with premature death.Graph: CARB

This means truck and engine makers must implement the low-NOX regulations at the same time CARB is compelling them to displace those trucks with zero-emission vehicles.

“The compounding and overlapping nature of the two regulatory mandates that CARB approved this summer threatens California’s commercial truck market,” Mandel said. “Instead of purchasing expensive, complicated and unproven new vehicles in California, truck operators and freight shippers are likely to maintain old trucks longer and seek solutions outside the state.”

CARB Chair Mary D. Nichols said in a statement: “Even as California ramps up the numbers of zero-emission electric and fuel-cell trucks on our roads over the next decade and beyond, tens of thousands of new internal combustion trucks will still be sold in our state. This regulation ensures that conventional diesel trucks will run as cleanly as possible at every point in their duty cycle. It takes a significant bite out of smog-forming pollution in every region in the state, and will make a major contribution to cleaning the air in communities close to ports, railyards and distribution centers that are now most heavily impacted by pollution from heavy truck traffic.”

CARB expects that once it is fully phased in by 2031, the rule will reduce harmful NOx emissions in California by more than 23 tons per day – the equivalent of taking 16 million light-duty cars off the road. (For context, California currently has 26 million registered light-duty vehicles). This will also result in 3,900 avoided premature deaths and 3,150 avoided hospitalizations statewide over the life of the rule (2024 – 2050), CARB predicts, and lead to estimated statewide health benefits (savings from health care costs) of approximately $36.8 billion.

EMA contended that CARB has underestimated the costs associated with implementing the Omnibus Low-NOX Rule and overestimated the potential environmental benefits.

And, it said, the new rule will result in increased fuel consumption, placing the regulations in conflict with CARB’s greenhouse gas standards. We saw this in the early 2000s, when strict new federal regulations lowering NOx limits resulted in lower fuel economy.

At the same time, truck and engine makers are already working to meet more stringent fuel-economy standards as part of federal greenhouse gas reduction regulations.

Federal NOx rule?

Truck and engine makers would rather see a national rule instead of a state-specific one. The American Trucking Associations also has expressed support for “one national, harmonized NOx emissions standard.”

Early this year, the Environmental Protection Agency issued an advance notice of proposed rulemaking to establish more stringent heavy-duty diesel truck emission standards for oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and other pollutants, part of its Cleaner Trucks initiative announced in 2018.

HDT Talks Trucking Podcast: The Future of Fuel Economy

At that time, Allen Schaeffer, executive director of the Diesel Technology Forum, which advocates for cleaner diesel, said the EPA move “follows support for a new low-NOx standard from truck and engine makers and petitions for rulemaking from a number of state and local air agencies.”

However, that comment period closed in February and there has not been a notice of proposed rulemaking resulting from it at this time. The Natural Resources Defense Council, which supports the new rule, notes that “the earliest that rule would come into effect is 2027 and is currently facing additional delays.”

“The Heavy-Duty Omnibus rule will push manufacturers to innovate and deploy technically feasible and cost-effective emission reduction technology sooner: charting a course for the U.S. EPA to follow,” NRDC said on its website.

One technology engine and component makers have already been exploring to meet anticipated low-NOx emissions rules is cylinder deactivation. Both Cummins and Jacobs have been developing and testing this technology.

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NGV Global Group Employee Appreciation Awards

We wanted to thank all our hard working employees at NGV Global Group and award those who are going above and beyond in trying times. It is a work ethic like yours that helps us be the success that we are. We applaud you all and thank you again for your commitment to excellence.

NGV Global Group’s operations have been bustling along, providing the trucking industry with essential Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) Trucks for their fleets. These trucks and their operators are driving farther and harder than ever, supplying our nation with much needed goods.

With all this extra demand in such a unique time, our essential employees are doing their part to make a difference. NGV Global Group wanted to create something to celebrate that hard work with some form of appreciation. So last week we set up an award show thanking everyone and shining the spotlight on some special people. Thank you all who safely attended.

For more information on how to acquire your CNG/RNG Box Trucks, Busses, and Semi Trucks, please call us. We can walk you through the steps and help you weigh your options regardless of your company size.  

GET MORE INFO

NGV Global Group Inc.

10733 Spangler Rd,

Dallas, TX 75220 USA

Phone: +1 (214) 630-1000

Mail: info@ngvglobalgroup.com

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New $22 million pilot to fund equitable, clean transportation options in disadvantaged communities

The California Air Resources Board will give up to $22 million in awards to address transportation needs in disadvantage and low income networks with clean transportation alternatives under another $22 million pilot venture.

The funding, accessible through the Sustainable Transportation Equity Project (STEP), will support the planning and usage of clean transportation ventures. Lead candidates may incorporate community based organizations, federally recognized tribes and local governments. Grant applicants include partnerships between a lead applicant, co-applicants (e.g. public, private or nonprofit organizations) and community partners. Proposals are due August 31, 2020.

“The goal of this new project is for communities to make decisions about their own transportation needs, and help residents get where they need to go — be it the doctor’s office, the grocery store, or daycare — without using a personal vehicle,” CARB Executive Officer Richard Corey said.

The grants are structured to support the unique needs of a community with the overarching goal to increase transportation equity in California’s disadvantaged and low-income communities. To accomplish this, STEP offers two grant types:

Up to $2 million for multiple Planning and Capacity Building Grants to help disadvantaged and low-income communities identify residents’ transportation needs and prepare them to implement clean transportation projects like:
Community transportation needs assessments
Feasibility studies
Community engagement activities or events
Combined mobility and land use plans
Up to $20 million for one to three Implementation Grants to fund combinations of clean transportation and supporting projects that will help residents in disadvantaged communities get where they need to go without a personal vehicle including:
New bus-rapid transit or vanpool service
Bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure
Land use and mobility plan
Parking pricing program
Applicants should identify which grant type best suits their needs.

CARB will host multiple teleconference sessions to answer questions throughout the solicitation period. Technical assistance may also be provided to interested applicants. Applicants can also email STEP staff members at step@arb.ca.gov.

Please note that these funding amounts are not guaranteed and are subject to change. The final funding amount will be determined through a public work group meeting during the solicitation period and the resulting determination will be posted at Low Carbon Transportation Investments Meetings & Workshops.

STEP is part of California Climate Investments, a statewide initiative that has put billions of cap-and-trade dollars to work reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening the economy, and improving public health and the environment — particularly in disadvantaged communities. STEP is part of a larger approach to promoting low-carbon transportation solutions in California. Other programs range from Clean Mobility Options, a pilot also providing funding for smaller-scale shared mobility projects, to the Clean Vehicle Assistance Program, providing grants and affordable financing to help get people into clean cars.

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Trucking’s Journey To Zero Emissions With CNG, RNG

Trucking fleets of all sizes will be affected by the mandates that are taking place in the industry throughout the country. As the timeline to be compliant with new laws comes closer everyday, owners and fleet managers are looking for viable options that fit with their business model. 

John H. Davis, is the host and executive producer for “Motor Week” of 40 years and spoke in regards to these industry challenges. “The challenge for every fleet—no matter how small—and every manufacturer is to get ahead of these mandates for new technologies using alternative fuels,” Davis said. “And I don’t mean just electrification either. As we all know, there is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to alternative fuels and commercial trucks.”

Change was on the horizon years ago, we are now in it. With more and more data showing the health and environmental effects that emissions have, companies are taking steps to secure their future in a changing industry. Truck Fleets are switching out a percentage or all of their vehicles to CNG Trucks to secure their future bid in the industry.

CNG trucking has become even more popular as RNG (Renewable Natural Gas) competes as one of the cleanest alternative fuels. The reason why it competes with even the electric market is renewable natural gas is already here, and already being released into the environment. Waste water treatment sites, cattle farms and land fills that are already burning methane are abundant in RNG. By taking this RNG and repurposing it into vehicles you get a negative NOx. 

Infrastructure for CNG is already in place in most areas. In addition, companies can add their own CNG facility on property and create gas from .40 to .90 cents a gallon. Minus that from your current diesel costs per month and you are looking at significant savings. NGV Global Group has been increasing their production of Compressed Natural Gas Trucks to keep up with the demand. NGV Global Group has been receiving an increase in Class-6 local delivery trucks and Semi Trucks.

NGV Global Group offers truck fleets leasing and purchasing options for CNG Trucks. NGV Global Group has helped companies of all sizes navigate in the alternative fuel vehicle space. 

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NGV Global Group Inc.

10733 Spangler Rd,

Dallas, TX 75220 USA

Phone: +1 (214) 630-1000

Mail: info@ngvglobalgroup.com

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How Much Clean Air Could $100 Million Buy?

California has the worst air pollution in the nation and diesel trucks are largely to blame. Original Story

Heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks are the backbone of California’s thriving goods movement economy, but they also deliver a lot of negative impacts to the state. As the largest single source of emissions in California, HD diesel trucks cause smog and unhealthy air for 90% of Californians[1]. HD diesel trucks emit NOx (oxides of nitrogen) and diesel particulate matter (DPM), which can cause a range of health issues including asthma, cancer, heart disease, and premature death. These impacts are particularly pronounced in California’s many disadvantaged communities (DACs) which are already overburdened by HD diesel truck emissions. In addition, HD diesel trucks are one of North America’s largest and most rapidly growing sources of climate-altering greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions which are detrimental to clean air.

California is facing several near-term deadlines to meet the minimum standards set by the federal government for clean and healthy air. Southern California only has until the end of 2022 to significantly cut smog-forming ozone emissions in order to reach these minimum federal requirements. Failure to meet these federal regulations can trigger fines and penalties, including withholding billions of dollars of federal highway funds. Of course, this is all in addition to the deadly toll diesel truck exhaust continues to take on the health of thousands of Californians on a daily basis.

Reducing diesel truck emissions is the only way that California can meet its clean air objectives. The state must find a way to get as many diesel trucks off the road as possible, and as quickly as possible, while ensuring industry can continue to thrive and grow the economy. With increasingly limited resources to achieve these multiple goals, the agencies responsible for providing healthy air for all Californians – especially those in DACs – must pursue the most immediate and most cost-effective solutions available.  There is simply no other choice.

So how do we get there?

To answer this, let’s look at what a hypothetical $100 million government investment could achieve when using one of California’s most popular funding programs. Which option would you chose if both cost the same?

Increasing deployment of RNG trucks will result in better clean air levels than using EV trucks.

How to stretch our dollars the farthest.

Did you guess that “Option A” was a near-zero emission natural gas truck? If so, great job. Option B results from using battery-electric trucks.

It may be surprising to learn that natural gas trucks can deliver the most emissions reductions, even when compared to trucks that don’t have tailpipes. The simple side-by-side comparison above demonstrates how the cost-effectiveness of these investments can yield significant benefits in terms of the number of clean trucks deployed and overall benefits that can be immediately achieved.

Here’s how this was calculated. Using one of California’s most popular funding programs (HVIP), a heavy-duty battery-electric vehicle (HD BEV) is eligible for a $150,000 incentive per truck. With $100 million government investment, 667 trucks could be funded ($100,000,000 / $150,000 = 667 HD BEVs funded).

A HD BEV typically has a range of 100 to 150 miles per charge and drives an estimated total of 12,000 miles per year[2]. Using these assumptions, the state could achieve the nitrous oxide (NOx) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions shown below.

22.3 Total Annual Tons of NOx Reduced                       
12,216 Total Annual Metric Tons of GHG Reduced

Through the same HVIP program, a heavy-duty natural gas vehicle (HD NGV) is eligible for a $45,000 incentive per truck. The lower incentive is because HD NGVs have a much lower upfront purchase cost ($160,000 for a natural gas truck vs. $300,000 [short-range] to $605,000 [long-range] for battery-electric trucks, pre-FET and sales tax[3]). With $100 million in government investment, the state could fund 2,222 natural gas trucks ($100,000,000 / $45,000 = 2,222 HD NGVs funded).

A HD NGV typically has a range of 550 to 700 miles on a full tank. This additional range allows it to work much longer than can a HD BEV.  Using the total potential daily range, a HD NGV can easily drive 150,000 miles or more per year.  However, for consistency with the HD BEV calculation above, we’ve used a much more conservative estimate of 25,000 miles per year.[4] Therefore, with the same assumptions and formulas that were used for the HD BEV calculation, the associated emissions benefits of funding natural gas trucks are confirmed to be four to five times higher:

Natural Gas trucks are effective at reducing emission levels, resulting in clean air.

 139.5 Total Annual Tons of NOx Reduced                                 53,667   Total Annual Metric Tons of GHG Reduced[5]

Since most people don’t think in terms of “metric tons of emissions,” the example below translates the greenhouse gas emission benefit into something more relatable to our daily lives.

Funding NGV trucks is equivalent to clean air benefits from removing many more passenger vehicles.

The ability to achieve major progress in clean air right now.

Ultimately, both electric and natural gas vehicle technologies will play important roles in California’s clean transportation future. Experts agree that there is no “one size fits all” solution to meet the diverse operational needs of all California fleet operators—from transit to delivery, goods movement, agriculture, construction, schools, utilities, refuse collection, and public works. If California wants to have a fighting chance in achieving its clean air deadlines and bringing healthy air to millions of Californian’s living with persistent smog, maximizing near term actions and scaled deployments of cost-effective clean technology will be absolutely critical.

A few vehicle manufacturers are starting early pilot projects for HD BEVs. Unfortunately, for the large trucks that haul our goods and produce the most amount of emissions, scalable HD BEV solutions are not commercially available today. In fact, many manufacturers have stated that in the first several years of introducing HD BEVs to market, only a few hundred trucks will be manufactured each year, and deployment opportunities will be significantly restricted by the lack of an available charging infrastructure.

It’s no surprise that many industry experts have stated that HD BEVs will not be utilized on a wide scale for at least 10 years or more given the limited availability of vehicles, high purchase costs, and the need to develop an entire support ecosystem (e.g., high-powered public and private charging infrastructure, utility rate programs, dealership sales and service, parts distribution, etc.). With millions of HD diesel trucks on U.S. roadways, HD BEVs will be unlikely to make a significant dent in our air quality and climate challenges in the in the immediate term. Fortunately, however, HD NGVs are available and viable, and ready to make a differencetoday, and at scale.

HD NGVs are commercially available today from 10 major truck manufacturers—including Freightliner, Volvo, Kenworth, Mack, Peterbilt, and others. With these well-established brands also comes robust sales and service networks already in place to support HD NGVs at scale – especially in California. With the demonstrated power, performance and reliability required to meet fleets’ rigorous daily operations, there are more than 175,000 NGVs in operation across the United States today, which are supported by a strong and growing network of fueling stations. Given their widespread commercial availability, proven operations, and with the entire support ecosystem already in place, the continued scaling up deployments of this clean air technology can take place immediately – an extremely important issue when trying to reduce emissions and protect human health as quickly as possible.

Ultimately, it’s critical that California continue to support market competition among all clean transportation technology solution providers—including natural gas, battery-electric, clean diesel, propane autogas, hydrogen fuel cell, and others. Competition accelerates technology innovation, and leads to improved operational, environmental, and cost performance.

With more limited financial resources available, prioritizing incentive funding to facilitate large volume deployments of clean transportation technologies that get the most bang for the buck is absolutely critical to achieving clean air and climate change mitigation as quickly, effectively and efficiently as possible. 

Interested in Learning More About the Benefits of Natural Gas Trucks and Renewable Natural Gas (RNG)?

Keep Reading… 

1. Natural gas truck emissions are practically undetectable.

NGV trucks produce less emissions than typical passenger cars, which is beneficial for clean air.

Equivalent NOx Emissions/Mile[6]It’s true that natural gas trucks still produce tailpipe emissions, but the most harmful emissions—the ones that immediately impact human health and the environment—are so low that they are called “near zero emission” trucks.

These emissions from HD NGVs are in fact so low that they are comparable to the emissions that come out of the tailpipe of a typical light-duty gasoline car on the market today – a truly amazing feat for an 80,000 truck!

2. Using RNG enables fleets to go beyond carbon neutrality and save money.

RNG can make huge contributions towards clean air quality.

The natural gas that fuels vehicles can be produced from a variety of renewable sources including wastewater treatment plants, food and green waste, landfills, dairies, and farms.

Producing natural gas from these renewable sources provides an unmatched opportunity to capture the methane – which is a greenhouse gas – that would have otherwise been emitted into the atmosphere through each source’s natural decomposition cycle. By capturing this methane and using it to displace diesel fuel in a HD truck, RNG can have a “negative” carbon intensity (i.e., beyond carbon neutrality).

A 2020 report from Lawrence Livermore National Labs found that for California to achieve its 2045 carbon neutrality goals, investments in carbon negative actions will be required[7] . RNG is readily available to achieve such actions, today.

Not only are fleets using low carbon RNG helping to immediately reduce large volumes of climate change gases, they are also able to further lower their fuel cost via the financial credits afforded under the federal RIN Program and California’s LCFS Program.

3. The U.S. can produce large volumes of RNG.

More than 75% of natural gas used for transportation in California already comes from renewable sources[8]. The production of renewable natural gas (RNG) in California continues to grow significantly.

Additionally, a recent study confirmed that the total amount of RNG available in the U.S. could ultimately offset 75% of all current diesel fuel used in the national transportation sector. [9]

4. Natural gas trucks give us the ability to tackle California’s air pollution today.

175,000+ HD NGVs contribute to clean air goals across the U.S.

HD NGVs are commercially available today from 10 different major truck manufacturers—including Freightliner, Volvo, Kenworth, Mack, Peterbilt, and others. With these well-established brands also comes robust sales and service networks ready to support HD NGVs, especially in California where this clean air technology has been increasingly and successfully used for more than two decades.

Given HD NGV’s widespread commercial availability, proven operations, and with the entire support ecosystem already in place, the continued scaling up deployments of this clean air technology can take place immediately – an extremely important issue when trying to reduce emissions as quickly as possible.

NGV Global Group has increased its production of a variety of NGV Truck conversions that range from to meet demand of across a variety of transporting needs.

Find Out What Truck Best Suits Your Needs Schedule A Consultation

Original Story https://www.act-news.com/news/how-much-clean-air-could-100-million-buy/

Sources:

[1] American Lung Association, 2019 State of the Air Report. https://www.lung.org/media/press-releases/20th-sota-ca

[2] California Air Resources Board, 2019-2020 Clean Transportation Incentives Funding Plan, Appendix A. https://ww2.arb.ca.gov/sites/default/files/2019-09/fy1920fundingplan-appa.pdf

[3] 2018 Feasibility Assessment for Cargo-Handling Equipment, September 2019. https://www.gladstein.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Final-CHE-Feasibility-Assessment_August-2019-Master.pdf

[4] California Air Resources Board, 2019-2020 Clean Transportation Incentives Funding Plan, Appendix A. https://ww2.arb.ca.gov/sites/default/files/2019-09/fy1920fundingplan-appa.pdf

[5] This emissions analysis in based on the California Air Resources Board’s assumptions from their FY19-20 funding plan, including using the average carbon intensity of RNG consumed in California in 2016 based on Low Carbon Fuel Standard data.

[6] Based on testing conducted by the University of California at Riverside on a 12L NZ natural gas engine (https://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/CWI-LowNOx-12L-NG_v03.pdf) which showed NOx emissions ranging from 0.02 to 0.11 g/mi. By comparison, the average MY2020 passenger car has NOx emissions of 0.025 g/mi (per EMFAC 2017).

[7] Getting to Neutral: Options for Negative Carbon Emissions in California, January 2020. https://www-gs.llnl.gov/content/assets/docs/energy/Getting_to_Neutral.pdf

[8] Calculation based on California Air Resources Board 2018 Low Carbon Fuel Standard Data

[9] American Gas Foundation, December 2019, Renewable Sources of Natural Gas: Supply & Emission Reduction Assessment Study. https://www.gasfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/AGA_3894-RNG-2-Pager_V-11.pdf

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