Texas RNG Gas Projects Keep Growing

RNG is an affordable and proven natural gas vehicle technology,
fueled with biomethane (RNG) and it’s growing in Texas. It’s collected at local landfills, wastewater treatment plants, commercial food waste facilities, and agricultural digesters that can yield a carbon-negative lifecycle emissions result.

There are over 20 RNG projects completed, under-construction or proposed in Texas. These projects have been popping up all over the state. Many of these projects are being created to supply transportation industry with renewable natural gas with no signs of slowing. All of these projects have one common need. A pipeline.

NGV Global Group is the parent company of Texas Gas Transport (TGT). TGT has provided high-pressure cryogenic fuel logistics services to a variety of clients in the industrial/manufacturing and power generation industries. TGT is the premier carrier of CNG and LNG in the Southwest market. TGT is capable in the assistance of creating a virtual pipeline to help connect all the RNG dots. In fact they are licensed and equipped to run in 48 continental states.

This strengthening of RNG infrastructure through growth and networking is great news for logistics companies looking to adapt to lowering their companies carbon footprint and adopting sustainability efforts. NGV Global Group’s Heavy Vehicle CNG/RNG Remanufacturing plant headquartered in Dallas Texas assists small and large fleets in accomplishing these goals.

A company in need of RNG vehicles or interested in RNG fueling options can receive consulting from NGV Global Group and are encouraged to reach out. NGV Global Group understands the daunting task of keeping full speed ahead while modifying an active fleet at the same time.

GET MORE INFO on CNG for your business.

NGV Global Group Inc.

10733 Spangler Rd,

Dallas, TX 75220 USA

Phone: +1 (214) 630-1000

Mail: info@ngvglobalgroup.com

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Texas’s Renewable Natural Gas Boom

What is Renewable Natural Gas?

Renewable Natural Gas is pipeline quality or transportation fuel quality biogas. RNG is primarily methane captured off landfills, farm digesters, and wastewater treatment plants. RNG is produced from non-fossil, organic waste sources and is 100% compatible with geologic natural gas – as a drop in blend or complete substitute. On a lifecycle basis, RNG yields a 70-130% emission reduction as compared to diesel.

Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program

The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) requires transportation fuel sold in the United States to contain a minimum volume of renewable fuels to replace or reduce the quantity of petroleum-based transportation fuel, heating oil or jet fuel each year. It was part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), and is regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The four renewable fuel categories under the RFS are:

  • Biomass-based diesel
  • Cellulosic biofuel
  • Advanced biofuel
  • Total renewable fuel

For a fuel to qualify as a renewable fuel under the RFS program:

  • Fuels must achieve a reduction in EPA designated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as compared to a 2005 petroleum baseline.
  • Companies need to petition for new fuel pathway. A fuel pathway is a specific combination of three components: (1) feedstock, (2) production process and (3) fuel type.
  • RINs (Renewable Identification Numbers) are used for bookkeeping & meeting RFS targets

Most biomethane qualifies as Cellulosic Biofuel under the RFS and generates a D3 RIN. In some cases, biomethane qualifies as an Advanced Biofuel and generates a D5 RIN.

Who Is using RNG vehicle fuel?

RNG is produced for vehicle fuel at 37 sites across the U.S. In 2016, 230 Million gallons of RNG will fuel mostly medium and heavy duty vehicles at public, private and municipal stations.  

UPS

  • Agreement with Clean Energy Fuels Corp. to use up to 500,000 gallon equivalents of RNG annually in Texas.
  • UPS stations in Houston & Mesquite will dispense the RLNG to a fleet of about 140 UPS tractors.
  • UPS California current agreement w/ Clean Energy, is using 1.5 M gallon equivalents of RCNG, UPS operates nearly 400 CNG vehicles.

Fair Oaks Farm, one of the largest dairy farms nationwide, has partnered with ampCNG to transform manure from 15,000 cows into 1.5 million DGEs of bio-CNG per year. ampCNG operates 19 public CNG stations and provides fuel for dairy haulers and other national fleets. It currently produces  approximately two million DGEs of RNG per year, with plans to dispense 100% RCNG in 2017.

How much is a RIN worth?

RINS are based on an ethanol gallon. Converted into renewable CNG measurements, a gasoline gallon equivalent of CNG has 1.5 RIN and is worth about $3 in 2016. According to Luke Morrow, Morrow Renewables, typically 70-80 percent of the $3 value goes to the producer, 10-20 percent to the pipeline distribution company and 2.5-10 percent to the refueling station owner.

Parties can either use actual “wet” gallons, trade through brokers, or purchase credits from other obligated parties. These credits are identified and tracked through a Renewable Identification Number and are known as RINs. See RIN Fact Sheet.

RNG used in vehicles generates higher value than that used in power generation, because there are no RINs available for power generation. Air LiquideAir LiquideCan I create long-term contracts with a refiner or other obligated party to buy my RINs?

Renewable fuel producers such as landfill operators, dairy farms or other organic waste producers generate RINs when a producer makes a gallon of renewable fuel. They can be traded, carried over to the following year and used by “obligated parties” to show compliance with their volume obligations. RINs have a vintage year corresponding to the year they are produced and typically have a maximum life span of 18 months.

Are there sources of RNG in Texas?

  • Cambrian Energy owns and operates a biomethane production facility at: McCommas Bluff landfill in Dallas. (15 million cubic feet per day, 2014.)
  • Morrow Renewables owns and operates six landfill sites in south Texas to produce RNG for vehicle use.
  • Toro Energy owns and operates two landfill sites in Texas.
  • Montauk Energy owns and operates two landfill sites in Texas.
  • Ameresco developed and operates the San Antonio Wastewater Treatment Plant RNG project.

RNG Trucking Solutions

NGV Global Group Has expanded their operations facility in Dallas Tx recently as demand continues to rise. NGV Global Retrofits and remanufactures all truck classes to be RNG ready. From Class-6 local delivery trucks to semi trailers NGV Global Group’s expert experience has been helping fleets nationally fulfill their CNG/RNG Trucking Needs for years. NGV Global Group’s unique style involves building a custom solution and guiding the customer from start to finish.

GET MORE INFO on CNG vehicle acquisition for your business

NGV Global Group Inc.

10733 Spangler Rd,

Dallas, TX 75220 USA

Phone: +1 (214) 630-1000

Mail: info@ngvglobalgroup.com

Read more

CalPortland Taps CNG to Fuel Bulk Hauler Truck Fleet

CalPortland Co., a producer of concrete products and asphalt in the western U.S. and Canada, has launched its compressed natural gas (CNG) powered bulk hauler truck fleet. The company commissioned 24 new near-zero-emission trucks to transport cement to customers in Southern California.

CalPortland’s near-zero vehicles will be fueled with Redeem by Clean Energy at a new private fueling hub located at CalPortland’s Oro Grande, Calif., cement plant. Developed by OZINGA Energy, the fueling hub consists of 24 slow-fill stations and one fast-fill station.

Redeem, a renewable natural gas (RNG) vehicle fuel, is derived from biogenic methane that is naturally generated by the decomposition of organic waste at landfills and agricultural waste sources. Utilizing Redeem instead of diesel or gasoline can reduce carbon emissions by at least 70% and up to 300%, depending upon the sources.

“In 2017 Catalina Pacific, a CalPortland company, commissioned 118 new near-zero emission concrete mixer trucks that serve the greater Los Angeles area,” says Allen Hamblen, president and CEO of CalPortland. “By adding 24 cement bulk hauler trucks and a fueling center at our Oro Grande cement plant, CalPortland continues to demonstrate our ongoing commitment to achieving zero emissions through environmental stewardship and lowering our carbon footprint within the communities where we operate.”

CalPortland’s CNG bulk hauler fleet is being partly funded with a Prop 1B grant from the South Coast Air Quality Management District. Additionally, the fueling station project received grant funds from the Mobile Source Emission Reductions Program (AB 2766) through the Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District.

The fleet consists of 24 Kenworth T680 trucks containing the Cummins Westport ISX12N Near Zero (NZ) natural gas engine. The engine is certified to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and CARB for meeting the 0.02 g/bhp-hr optional Low NOx Emissions standards – 90% lower than current emission standards. The Kenworth T680 trucks also feature an aerodynamic body to increase fuel efficiency, coupled with the Momentum 135DGE Fuel System which is designed for 600+ mile range.

GET MORE INFO on CNG vehicle acquisition for your business

NGV Global Group Inc.

10733 Spangler Rd,

Dallas, TX 75220 USA

Phone: +1 (214) 630-1000

Mail: info@ngvglobalgroup.com

Read more

Our Air Is Unhealthy To Breathe

Reality Check! Our air is unhealthy to breathe

134 million people in the United States live in counties that have unhealthy levels of either ozone or particle pollution. Breathing that air increases the risk of asthma, lung cancer and heart disease.

Heavy- and medium-duty vehicles are the No. 1 source of smog

While HDVs total 7 percent of all vehicles on America’s roadways, they account for upwards of 50 percent of all smog-precursor emissions and 20 percent of all transportation-related greenhouse gases (GHGs).

Heavy-duty vehicles – the fastest growing segment of U.S. transportation in terms of energy use and emissions – include:

Short-Haul Trucks
Long-Haul Trucks
Refuse Trucks
School Buses
Transit Buses

74% of Heavy-Duty trucks not certified to latest NOx emission standard. 26% of Heavy-Duty trucks meet NOx emission standard. Replace diesel HDVs & MDVs with Natural Gas Vehicles. NGVs deliver the largest and most cost-effective NOx emissions reductions. In-use testing results of heavy-duty trucks in port applications finds that diesel emits up to 5-times more NOx than certification levels. Natural gas certification levels for NOx are already 10x less than diesel.


It’s more than just the tail pipe … Life-cycle emissions matter too

According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, it takes so much energy to make batteries that Electric Vehicles with a 250-mile range start out life with a carbon footprint 68% higher than a piston-engine car. RNG Vehicles can take the gases already released into our atmosphere from landfills, water waste treatment, farms and food digesters and use it for fuel.

GET MORE INFO

NGV Global Group Inc.

10733 Spangler Rd,

Dallas, TX 75220 USA

Phone: +1 (214) 630-1000

Mail: info@ngvglobalgroup.com

Read more

New Natural Gas Buses are Zero Emissions Equivalent and More Reliable then Electric Buses

New Natural Gas Buses are Zero Emissions Equivalent
Natural gas buses today reduce harmful emissions of
nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) by more
than 95 percent compared to transit buses built prior to 2010,
thus the emission difference between new natural gas buses
and electric buses, which have no tailpipe emissions but do
have particulate matter emissions associated with tire wear
and braking, are miniscule. Importantly, natural gas buses
produce these emission reductions without relying upon
costly and cumbersome emission control equipment.
Fueling transit buses with conventional (geologic) natural gas
reduces greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by about 12
percent compared to diesel. But according to the California
Air Resources Board, fueling buses with renewable natural
gas (biomethane) collected at local landfills, wastewater
treatment plants, commercial food waste facilities, and
agricultural digesters can yield a carbon-negative lifecycle
emissions result. According to CARB data, renewable natural
gas (RNG) holds the lowest carbon intensity of any on-road
vehicle fuel, including fully renewable electric. On-road
natural gas fueling trends show increasing adoption of RNG.
According to data from the U.S. Energy Information
Administration (EIA) and U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) Renewable Fuel Standard reporting, 39
percent of all on-road natural gas fuel in 2019 was RNG. In
California, 77 percent of all on-road natural gas fuel in 2019
was RNG.

When you add it all up, natural gas provides a winning
solution for transit agencies looking to lower costs and
reduce emissions. As estimated in this report, it could cost
billions – as much as $24 billion more – to switch the majority
of the U.S. larger bus fleets to an all-electric fleet. Switching
the majority of the U.S. bus fleet to an all-CNG fleet powered
by RNG would not only save significant capital and operating
amounts of money but also would generate much greater
annual emission reductions: 10,000 tons of GHG, 25 tons of
NOx, and 6.26 tons of PM2.5

Grid Upgrades
Electric bus advocates fail to evaluate the cost and extent of
major utility upgrades needed to accommodate an
expected surge in electricity transmission and demand for
electric buses, upgrades not needed to fuel natural gas
buses. These factors are easily overlooked in the case of
demonstration projects involving only a limited number of
buses but can quickly become overwhelming when
converting an entire fleet to electricity. This is not an issue for
natural gas as many bus facilities around the country have
been converted entirely or almost entirely to natural gas with
hundreds of buses fueling at a single depot. Nearly 100
transit agencies currently operate more than 10,000 natural
gas buses with additional natural gas buses successfully in
service at many other facilities such as airports and colleges
across the United States.
Reliability
In the reports evaluated by NGVAmerica, natural gas buses
have demonstrated that they are more reliable than electric
buses, accumulating far more service miles, spending fewer
days out of service and under-repair than electric buses. A
key factor of reliability is availability for pull out. In the studies
prepared by NREL evaluating real-world bus fleets, natural
gas buses morethan exceed the expected rate of 85 percent
availability while electric buses struggle to meet the
requirement. In the Foothill fleet, during the most recent
evaluation period the twelve 35-foot electric buses had an
average availability rate of 63 percent.

The availability for electric buses was as low as 46 percent during
the first half of 2019. In contrast, CNG buses had an
availability rate of 93 percent for the same period and an
overall availability rate of 96 percent.4
Once out on route, CNG buses had far fewer road calls, or
revenue vehicle system failures, than their electric
counterparts in the Foothill study. Such incidents require a
bus to be replaced on route and/or cause a significant
schedule delay affecting system operations. Such reliability
in the transit industry is measured in mean distance (miles)
between failures (road calls), or MBRC. At Foothill, the
average miles between road calls for natural gas buses
exceeds that of the BEBs by between 18,000 to almost
20,000 miles.5
Fuel Efficiency
Much attention is given to the efficiency of electric buses but
very few studies or reports acknowledge efficiency losses
associated with charging infrastructure which can increase
energy consumption by 10 – 15 percent. And when
determining the overall energy efficiency of electric bus
transit operations, it is important to consider that more than
60 percent of energy used to generate electricity is lost in
conversion. According to the U.S. Department of Energy,
U.S. utility-scale generation facilities consumed 38 quadrillion
British thermal units (quads) of energy to produce only 14
quads of electricity last year.6
Efficiency claims also almost never acknowledge the tradeoffs associated with heating and cooling of buses, which is
not accounted for in the test cycles used to determine
efficiency ratings of transit buses. Another fact that is often
omitted is the large percentage of electric buses that are
equipped with fossil fueled heaters to reduce the need to
draw on electricity to provide heat. Such heaters can be a
significant emission source that are not at all considered.

If you would like a no cost obligation in regard to Bus Fleet Options. Please contact us for a consultation.

GET MORE INFO

NGV Global Group Inc.

10733 Spangler Rd,

Dallas, TX 75220 USA

Phone: +1 (214) 630-1000

Mail: info@ngvglobalgroup.com

Read more