Oregon DEQ releases timeline for Clean Fuels Program expansion

By Erin Voegele | May 27, 2020

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality on May 18 announced it has submitted detailed information to Gov. Kate Brown on how it plans to carry out her March 10 executive order that set a new goal for greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction.

The plans submitted by DEQ include a preliminary report on cap and reduce programs, and work plans related to clean fuels, strategies to reduce GHG emissions from transportation, regulations to reduce methane emissions from landfills, and strategies to reduce food waste.

One provision of the March 10 executive order directs state agencies to expand the Oregon Clean Fuels Program to enable the state to reduce the average amount of GHG emissions per unit of fuel energy by 20 percent below 2015 levels by 2030 and 25 percent below 2015 levels by 2035. The work plan submitted by DEQ describes the steps necessary to carry out the expansion of the Clean Fuels Program and includes a high-level summary of some of the key policy issues that will be addressed leading up to and including rulemakings by the state’s Environmental Quality Commission.  

The Clean Fuels Program work plan also includes a proposed timeline for expansion of the program. A formal rulemaking for the expansion of the program is expected to begin near the end of the third quarter of 2021. Until that time, the agency plans to undertake several studies and other activities related to the future rulemaking.

Another provision of the March 10 executive order directs state agencies to take actions necessary to reduce gas emissions from landfill as part of the state’s goal to achieve GHG reductions of at least 45 percent by 2035 and 80 percent by 2050. According to the work plan, the DEQ plans to begin developing a rulemaking on landfill gas during the fourth quarter of this year. Landfills would be required to submit design plans for methane gas collection systems in late 2021 and early 2022. Landfills would install approve methane gas collection systems beginning in 2023. The work plan also briefly discusses compliance measures that may be available to landfills seeking alternative compliance pathways, such as decreasing incoming volumes of cardboard, paper fibers, grass clipping and similar materials.  

The DEQ said it will be holding virtual workshops and listening sessions on program options related to the March 10 executive order over the next six months.

“Oregon DEQ is committed to listening to all Oregonians, including community and business leaders, as we develop the specifics of how these programs are going to work,” said Richard Whitman, director of the DEQ. “We recognize that Oregon is in the midst of another crisis—the COVID-19 crisis—and DEQ is building those challenges into how we are approaching this effort. At the same time, we also recognize that Oregon and the rest of the world are running out of time to begin bringing greenhouse gas emissions under control. The governor has given us 18 months to get this work done, and we are going to do our very best to deliver a fair, thorough and well-founded set of programs that will put Oregon on the path to doing its part in combatting climate change.”

Additional information is available on the Oregon DEQ website. https://ngvglobalgroup.com/articles/17093/oregon-deq-releases-timeline-for-clean-fuels-program-expansion

Additional Information on CNG/RNG Vehicles https://ngvglobalgroup.com/about-us/

Read more

Natural Gas Truck Technology Proven Ready for the Rigors of Drayage Operations in San Pedro Bay Ports

Today’s commercially available, near-zero-emission (NZE) heavy-duty natural gas trucks have proven their readiness for the rigors of daily drayage truck operations at North America’s largest shipping ports, the San Pedro Bay ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. NZE natural gas trucks were officially upgraded to the highest Technology Readiness Level—TRL 9— in the Ports’ Feasibility Assessment for Drayage Trucks

NZE natural gas trucks are the first technology in the Ports’ assessment to achieve the TRL 9 rating (adapted from the U.S. Department of Energy’s “Technology Readiness Assessment Guide”). The assessment, first published by the Ports in March 2019, plays an integral role in the forward strategy of the Port’s groundbreaking Clean Trucks Program, as it evaluates the readiness of zero-emission (ZE) and NZE drayage truck fuel-technology platforms based on four key parameters: commercial availability, operational feasibility, infrastructure availability and economic workability.

NZE natural gas trucks are the first technology in the Ports’ feasibility assessment to achieve the TRL 9 rating, important to the Clean Trucks Program.

Seven Local Drayage Companies Led Demonstration Project

The upgraded rating was achieved following the successful demonstration of 20 natural gas trucks (powered by the Cummins ISX12N NZE engine) in daily drayage operations. Seven local drayage companies took part in the demonstration, including Total Transportation Services (TTSI), NFI, CR&R, Pacific 9 Transportation, 4Gen, Green Fleet Systems, and Orange Avenue Express. The demonstration trucks, designed for the 80,000 lbs gross combined weight rating typical in drayage, accumulated 567,603 miles running between the Ports and distribution centers throughout Southern California. Since completing the demonstration, the trucks have surpassed 1 million miles of operation.

“In our experience, NZE natural gas trucks are the closest direct replacement for diesel trucks in terms of their power and speed, the 600-mile range they provide between refueling, the ability to fast-fuel in about 10 or 15 minutes, and most importantly, their ability to compete on a cost-per-mile basis,” said Vic LaRosa, CEO and President of TTSI. “Our fleet has been operating NZE natural gas trucks reliably and cost-effectively for several years and plans to continue our investment based on the proven results and ROI we’ve achieved.”

The upgraded rating was achieved following the successful demonstration of 20 natural gas trucks (powered by the Cummins ISX12N NZE engine) in daily drayage operations.

Grant Funds Supported Demonstration

The demonstration, led by Clean Energy and Cummins Westport, was conducted under a grant (GFO-16-604) provided by the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD).

“Cummins Westport is excited for the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach to officially recognize the commercial readiness of NZE natural gas trucks,” said Gord Exel, President of Cummins Westport. “We have thousands of NZE natural gas engines now operating throughout the country in Class 8 trucking operations, and more than 100 operating in the Southern California Ports; there is no question that our ISX12N engines will continue to provide the power and performance needed to reliably haul freight every day.”

Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck Emissions Cause Smog

Nearly 40% of the nation’s total containerized import traffic and 25% of its total exports are handled by the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. Southern California is a major global goods movement hub with an expansive network of warehouse distribution centers. The heavy-duty diesel trucks that support the industry are the backbone of California’s thriving goods movement economy but are also one of the largest sources of emissions in Southern California. Heavy-duty diesel trucks cause smog and unhealthy air for 90% of Californians—about 35 million people. These impacts are particularly pronounced for residents living near major transportation corridors and in communities disproportionately impacted by truck traffic.

Southern California is a major global goods movement hub, but the heavy-duty diesel trucks that support the industry are one of the largest sources of emissions.

“Reducing diesel truck emissions from the 17,000 drayage trucks operating in our region each day will significantly reduce air pollution from the Ports,” said Wayne Nastri, Executive Officer at South Coast AQMD. “With a continued need for goods movement, it is critical to deploy more cost-effective, commercially ready near- or zero-emission solutions that can help us reach our clean air goals.”

“Air pollution from diesel trucks harms people every day in Southern California, so it is imperative that we see more aggressive efforts to meet the Ports’ stated goal of transitioning the current diesel-fueled drayage truck fleet – the largest fleet of trucks in Southern California – to near‐zero emission technology as soon as possible,” added Marc Carrel, President and CEO of BREATHE California of Los Angeles County.

No Limits on NZE Truck Production

The NZE ISX12N natural gas engine is produced in the Cummins engine plant in Jamestown, NY. “With our production capacity and partnership with Freightliner, Kenworth, Mack , Peterbilt and Volvo to sell this proven commercial product, there is effectively no limit on how many NZE trucks can be produced and delivered to meet the clean air needs of the Southern California ports,” Exel added. “As soon as the orders for these trucks are placed, we will build the engines and the trucks will be delivered shortly thereafter.”

NZE trucks can be delivered to meet the clean air needs of the Southern California ports. Fleets also benefit from the extensive public access natural gas refueling network.

Southern California fleets benefit from the existing and extensive public access natural gas refueling network, including multiple high-volume truck capable stations in the San Pedro Bay Ports, Southeast Los Angeles, and Inland Empire region. This fueling infrastructure is poised for the addition of several thousand trucks and the private sector is ready to invest in the development of additional infrastructure as demand grows.

“During these challenging economic times, this presents a unique opportunity for the deployment of private capital to facilitate our collective clean air efforts,” noted Andrew Littlefair, President and CEO of Clean Energy. “There is no need for public taxpayer or ratepayer incentives to build out this low carbon infrastructure; we have the private sector capital ready to go and we look forward to the Ports leading on this innovative public-private partnership opportunity.”

RNG Achieves Significant Reductions in GHG Emissions

When NZE natural gas trucks are fueled with renewable natural gas (RNG), significant reductions of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can also be achieved. In California, more than 75% of the natural gas vehicle fuel being used in California today is renewable, according to the California Air Resources Board (ARB) Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) program data (Q1-Q3 2019).  The average carbon intensity (CI) of natural gas in California is 39gCO2e/MJ, which is similar to the average CI value for electricity reported by ARB.

NGV Global offers CNG Trucks from all classes. NGV Global Group is a global technology company that designs, manufactures, distributes and supports natural gas operated medium and heavy duty commercial vehicles sold worldwide. We manufacture natural gas engines, fuel storage units and fueling systems for application in our own products and for sale to third party companies interested in the conversion of trucks and buses to operate on natural gas completely (dedicated) or in conjunction (duel-fuel)  with diesel fuel. 

Original Story: https://www.act-news.com/news/nze-natural-gas-truck-technology-proven-ready-for-the-rigors-of-drayage-operations-in-san-pedro-bay-ports/

Read more

How Much Clean Air Could $100 Million Buy?

California has the worst air pollution in the nation and diesel trucks are largely to blame. Original Story

Heavy-duty (HD) diesel trucks are the backbone of California’s thriving goods movement economy, but they also deliver a lot of negative impacts to the state. As the largest single source of emissions in California, HD diesel trucks cause smog and unhealthy air for 90% of Californians[1]. HD diesel trucks emit NOx (oxides of nitrogen) and diesel particulate matter (DPM), which can cause a range of health issues including asthma, cancer, heart disease, and premature death. These impacts are particularly pronounced in California’s many disadvantaged communities (DACs) which are already overburdened by HD diesel truck emissions. In addition, HD diesel trucks are one of North America’s largest and most rapidly growing sources of climate-altering greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions which are detrimental to clean air.

California is facing several near-term deadlines to meet the minimum standards set by the federal government for clean and healthy air. Southern California only has until the end of 2022 to significantly cut smog-forming ozone emissions in order to reach these minimum federal requirements. Failure to meet these federal regulations can trigger fines and penalties, including withholding billions of dollars of federal highway funds. Of course, this is all in addition to the deadly toll diesel truck exhaust continues to take on the health of thousands of Californians on a daily basis.

Reducing diesel truck emissions is the only way that California can meet its clean air objectives. The state must find a way to get as many diesel trucks off the road as possible, and as quickly as possible, while ensuring industry can continue to thrive and grow the economy. With increasingly limited resources to achieve these multiple goals, the agencies responsible for providing healthy air for all Californians – especially those in DACs – must pursue the most immediate and most cost-effective solutions available.  There is simply no other choice.

So how do we get there?

To answer this, let’s look at what a hypothetical $100 million government investment could achieve when using one of California’s most popular funding programs. Which option would you chose if both cost the same?

Increasing deployment of RNG trucks will result in better clean air levels than using EV trucks.

How to stretch our dollars the farthest.

Did you guess that “Option A” was a near-zero emission natural gas truck? If so, great job. Option B results from using battery-electric trucks.

It may be surprising to learn that natural gas trucks can deliver the most emissions reductions, even when compared to trucks that don’t have tailpipes. The simple side-by-side comparison above demonstrates how the cost-effectiveness of these investments can yield significant benefits in terms of the number of clean trucks deployed and overall benefits that can be immediately achieved.

Here’s how this was calculated. Using one of California’s most popular funding programs (HVIP), a heavy-duty battery-electric vehicle (HD BEV) is eligible for a $150,000 incentive per truck. With $100 million government investment, 667 trucks could be funded ($100,000,000 / $150,000 = 667 HD BEVs funded).

A HD BEV typically has a range of 100 to 150 miles per charge and drives an estimated total of 12,000 miles per year[2]. Using these assumptions, the state could achieve the nitrous oxide (NOx) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions shown below.

22.3 Total Annual Tons of NOx Reduced                       
12,216 Total Annual Metric Tons of GHG Reduced

Through the same HVIP program, a heavy-duty natural gas vehicle (HD NGV) is eligible for a $45,000 incentive per truck. The lower incentive is because HD NGVs have a much lower upfront purchase cost ($160,000 for a natural gas truck vs. $300,000 [short-range] to $605,000 [long-range] for battery-electric trucks, pre-FET and sales tax[3]). With $100 million in government investment, the state could fund 2,222 natural gas trucks ($100,000,000 / $45,000 = 2,222 HD NGVs funded).

A HD NGV typically has a range of 550 to 700 miles on a full tank. This additional range allows it to work much longer than can a HD BEV.  Using the total potential daily range, a HD NGV can easily drive 150,000 miles or more per year.  However, for consistency with the HD BEV calculation above, we’ve used a much more conservative estimate of 25,000 miles per year.[4] Therefore, with the same assumptions and formulas that were used for the HD BEV calculation, the associated emissions benefits of funding natural gas trucks are confirmed to be four to five times higher:

Natural Gas trucks are effective at reducing emission levels, resulting in clean air.

 139.5 Total Annual Tons of NOx Reduced                                 53,667   Total Annual Metric Tons of GHG Reduced[5]

Since most people don’t think in terms of “metric tons of emissions,” the example below translates the greenhouse gas emission benefit into something more relatable to our daily lives.

Funding NGV trucks is equivalent to clean air benefits from removing many more passenger vehicles.

The ability to achieve major progress in clean air right now.

Ultimately, both electric and natural gas vehicle technologies will play important roles in California’s clean transportation future. Experts agree that there is no “one size fits all” solution to meet the diverse operational needs of all California fleet operators—from transit to delivery, goods movement, agriculture, construction, schools, utilities, refuse collection, and public works. If California wants to have a fighting chance in achieving its clean air deadlines and bringing healthy air to millions of Californian’s living with persistent smog, maximizing near term actions and scaled deployments of cost-effective clean technology will be absolutely critical.

A few vehicle manufacturers are starting early pilot projects for HD BEVs. Unfortunately, for the large trucks that haul our goods and produce the most amount of emissions, scalable HD BEV solutions are not commercially available today. In fact, many manufacturers have stated that in the first several years of introducing HD BEVs to market, only a few hundred trucks will be manufactured each year, and deployment opportunities will be significantly restricted by the lack of an available charging infrastructure.

It’s no surprise that many industry experts have stated that HD BEVs will not be utilized on a wide scale for at least 10 years or more given the limited availability of vehicles, high purchase costs, and the need to develop an entire support ecosystem (e.g., high-powered public and private charging infrastructure, utility rate programs, dealership sales and service, parts distribution, etc.). With millions of HD diesel trucks on U.S. roadways, HD BEVs will be unlikely to make a significant dent in our air quality and climate challenges in the in the immediate term. Fortunately, however, HD NGVs are available and viable, and ready to make a differencetoday, and at scale.

HD NGVs are commercially available today from 10 major truck manufacturers—including Freightliner, Volvo, Kenworth, Mack, Peterbilt, and others. With these well-established brands also comes robust sales and service networks already in place to support HD NGVs at scale – especially in California. With the demonstrated power, performance and reliability required to meet fleets’ rigorous daily operations, there are more than 175,000 NGVs in operation across the United States today, which are supported by a strong and growing network of fueling stations. Given their widespread commercial availability, proven operations, and with the entire support ecosystem already in place, the continued scaling up deployments of this clean air technology can take place immediately – an extremely important issue when trying to reduce emissions and protect human health as quickly as possible.

Ultimately, it’s critical that California continue to support market competition among all clean transportation technology solution providers—including natural gas, battery-electric, clean diesel, propane autogas, hydrogen fuel cell, and others. Competition accelerates technology innovation, and leads to improved operational, environmental, and cost performance.

With more limited financial resources available, prioritizing incentive funding to facilitate large volume deployments of clean transportation technologies that get the most bang for the buck is absolutely critical to achieving clean air and climate change mitigation as quickly, effectively and efficiently as possible. 

Interested in Learning More About the Benefits of Natural Gas Trucks and Renewable Natural Gas (RNG)?

Keep Reading… 

1. Natural gas truck emissions are practically undetectable.

NGV trucks produce less emissions than typical passenger cars, which is beneficial for clean air.

Equivalent NOx Emissions/Mile[6]It’s true that natural gas trucks still produce tailpipe emissions, but the most harmful emissions—the ones that immediately impact human health and the environment—are so low that they are called “near zero emission” trucks.

These emissions from HD NGVs are in fact so low that they are comparable to the emissions that come out of the tailpipe of a typical light-duty gasoline car on the market today – a truly amazing feat for an 80,000 truck!

2. Using RNG enables fleets to go beyond carbon neutrality and save money.

RNG can make huge contributions towards clean air quality.

The natural gas that fuels vehicles can be produced from a variety of renewable sources including wastewater treatment plants, food and green waste, landfills, dairies, and farms.

Producing natural gas from these renewable sources provides an unmatched opportunity to capture the methane – which is a greenhouse gas – that would have otherwise been emitted into the atmosphere through each source’s natural decomposition cycle. By capturing this methane and using it to displace diesel fuel in a HD truck, RNG can have a “negative” carbon intensity (i.e., beyond carbon neutrality).

A 2020 report from Lawrence Livermore National Labs found that for California to achieve its 2045 carbon neutrality goals, investments in carbon negative actions will be required[7] . RNG is readily available to achieve such actions, today.

Not only are fleets using low carbon RNG helping to immediately reduce large volumes of climate change gases, they are also able to further lower their fuel cost via the financial credits afforded under the federal RIN Program and California’s LCFS Program.

3. The U.S. can produce large volumes of RNG.

More than 75% of natural gas used for transportation in California already comes from renewable sources[8]. The production of renewable natural gas (RNG) in California continues to grow significantly.

Additionally, a recent study confirmed that the total amount of RNG available in the U.S. could ultimately offset 75% of all current diesel fuel used in the national transportation sector. [9]

4. Natural gas trucks give us the ability to tackle California’s air pollution today.

175,000+ HD NGVs contribute to clean air goals across the U.S.

HD NGVs are commercially available today from 10 different major truck manufacturers—including Freightliner, Volvo, Kenworth, Mack, Peterbilt, and others. With these well-established brands also comes robust sales and service networks ready to support HD NGVs, especially in California where this clean air technology has been increasingly and successfully used for more than two decades.

Given HD NGV’s widespread commercial availability, proven operations, and with the entire support ecosystem already in place, the continued scaling up deployments of this clean air technology can take place immediately – an extremely important issue when trying to reduce emissions as quickly as possible.

NGV Global Group has increased its production of a variety of NGV Truck conversions that range from to meet demand of across a variety of transporting needs.

Find Out What Truck Best Suits Your Needs Schedule A Consultation

Original Story https://www.act-news.com/news/how-much-clean-air-could-100-million-buy/

Sources:

[1] American Lung Association, 2019 State of the Air Report. https://www.lung.org/media/press-releases/20th-sota-ca

[2] California Air Resources Board, 2019-2020 Clean Transportation Incentives Funding Plan, Appendix A. https://ww2.arb.ca.gov/sites/default/files/2019-09/fy1920fundingplan-appa.pdf

[3] 2018 Feasibility Assessment for Cargo-Handling Equipment, September 2019. https://www.gladstein.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Final-CHE-Feasibility-Assessment_August-2019-Master.pdf

[4] California Air Resources Board, 2019-2020 Clean Transportation Incentives Funding Plan, Appendix A. https://ww2.arb.ca.gov/sites/default/files/2019-09/fy1920fundingplan-appa.pdf

[5] This emissions analysis in based on the California Air Resources Board’s assumptions from their FY19-20 funding plan, including using the average carbon intensity of RNG consumed in California in 2016 based on Low Carbon Fuel Standard data.

[6] Based on testing conducted by the University of California at Riverside on a 12L NZ natural gas engine (https://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/CWI-LowNOx-12L-NG_v03.pdf) which showed NOx emissions ranging from 0.02 to 0.11 g/mi. By comparison, the average MY2020 passenger car has NOx emissions of 0.025 g/mi (per EMFAC 2017).

[7] Getting to Neutral: Options for Negative Carbon Emissions in California, January 2020. https://www-gs.llnl.gov/content/assets/docs/energy/Getting_to_Neutral.pdf

[8] Calculation based on California Air Resources Board 2018 Low Carbon Fuel Standard Data

[9] American Gas Foundation, December 2019, Renewable Sources of Natural Gas: Supply & Emission Reduction Assessment Study. https://www.gasfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/AGA_3894-RNG-2-Pager_V-11.pdf

Read more

27 Years Of National Transportation Progress with Clean Cities

27 years of transportation progress in the United States

Take a look at the impressive results Clean Cities have accomplished across the nation since the first Clean Cities coalition was designated in 1993.

27th_infographic-1

Nearly 100 local coalitions serve as the foundation of Clean Cities by working in communities across the country to implement alternative fuels, fuel-saving technologies and practices, and new mobility choices. Clean Cities coalitions are comprised of businesses, fuel providers, vehicle fleets, state and local government agencies, and community organizations. Each coalition is led by an on-the-ground Clean Cities coordinator who tailors projects and activities to capitalize on the unique opportunities within their communities. Nationwide, nearly 16,000 stakeholders participate in Clean Cities coalitions, and through their collective efforts they are transforming local and regional transportation markets.

What Does Clean Cities Coalition Do

At the national level, VTO develops partnerships and provides technical assistance and analysis, information resources, and online tools and data. At the local level, coalitions leverage these resources to create networks of local stakeholders and provide technical assistance to fleets implementing alternative and renewable fuels, idle-reduction measures, fuel economy improvements, and emerging transportation technologies.

Together, Clean Cities’ efforts support a broad set of approaches that improve transportation efficiency at the local, state, and national levels. Clean Cities’ activities include:

  • Building partnerships with local coalitions of public- and private-sector transportation stakeholders
  • Developing unbiased and objective information resources covering alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, new mobility choices, and other strategies that improve transportation efficiency and reduce costs
  • Maintaining interactive, data-driven online tools to help stakeholders evaluate options and achieve goals
  • Sharing best practices and lessons learned to inform choices and build a strong national network
  • Using robust processes to collect and maintain relevant data sets to inform transportation decision making
  • Providing technical assistance to help fleets deploy alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and fuel-saving measures
  • Working with industry partners and fleets to identify and address technology barriers and research needs
  • Empowering local decision makers to successfully identify and implement new transportation strategies
  • Seeding local alternative-fuel markets through projects that deploy vehicles and fueling infrastructure.

Clean Cities Coalition is a big part of the alternative fueling industry and have been with us every step of the way, advocating for all. Our greatest Thank You from everyone at NGV Global Group for your continued support in the industry as we push for a cleaner tomorrow.

#GivingTuesdayNow is TOMORROW! Consider showing support for your local Clean Cities Coalition, working toward clean air, efficient transportation, & diversifying fuel options. 27 years of transportation progress – we can continue with YOUR support!

Read more

COVID-19: a key moment to think of a more sustainable future

Last week we shared a recent report from Harvard University that found that the regions with the highest levels of particulate matter and pollution in the United States were the ones with the highest death rates from Covid-19. Along these same lines, we want to continue making visible this unprecedented phenomenon, which is affecting world health and economy, and the importance of seeking more sustainable practices to face the future.

For a long time, many governments around the world have outlined ambitious climate goals and have – current and future – strict regulations to reduce their environmental footprint and decarbonize the transport sector, one of the main generators of polluting emissions in the atmosphere. However, many of these goals aim to achieve zero emissions through technologies that are at an incipient level of development, as is the case of electric vehicles.

Although many automakers already offer this type of vehicle, with batteries, fuel cells or hybrids, its price is not within the reach of the entire population or its development is not enough for all automotive segments. For example, heavy road transport requires extensive travel range, as well as a solid network of refueling stations on its routes, which electric vehicles do not yet offer.

Currently, governments face the difficult task of controlling the health emergency and, at the same time, introducing economic and social recovery measures. But they must also take into account the ecological factor to address the future.

In this sense, natural gas as a transport fuel is available today and is a 100% developed and proven technology, used in all types of vehicles (private cars, vans, buses and heavy trucks), as well as in maritime and railway transport. In the form of CNG or LNG, this energy can be a fundamental piece of government policy to help improve the air in cities and drive an efficient and economical energy transition.

Thanks to its environmental benefits (30% less CO2, 75% less NOx, and almost zero emissions of particles and SO2), natural gas powered mobility will allow to rebuild more sustainable economies in the short term, always meeting the medium- and long-term objectives of the Paris Agreement. In turn, the cost of natural gas is usually half that of gasoline or diesel, so it will also serve to recover the economy from any pocket.

What is more, when using natural gas from renewable sources (biomethane), neutrality in CO2 emissions can be achieved. This fuel has a zero CO2 balance because it avoids the emissions produced in the fermentation of the waste and maintains the same benefits as natural gas for air quality. In addition, renewable natural gas is totally interchangeable with natural gas, allowing it to be distributed using current infrastructure, whether for vehicle, industrial, commercial or home use.

We are all witnessing how the pandemic and the restriction of hundreds of activities around the world, including the very circulation of people in urban centers, have been beneficial for the environment due to low levels of pollution. Fish and crystal clear waters in Venice, wild animals in deserted streets, are some cases.

Therefore, it is crucial that policymakers can tackle the critical situation the world is going through from a sustainable perspective, becoming aware of the importance of the environment and taking advantage of the tools that are already available to start making change today.

Read more